I am whatever I am when I am it.

loving whoever you are when the stars shine and whoever you'll be when the sun rises

Posts tagged violence

105 notes

Race seems permanent because we fail to remember that its perpetrators enjoy it and that masking their enjoyment only enhances it. Seducing one’s victim into an after-the-fact complicity, making one’s victims ‘remember perfectly,’ is not simply a masking technique, it is the central pleasure of race.

Anthony Farley (1997) ‘The Black Body as Fetish Object.’ Oregon Law Review. p. 469-70.

This always comes to mind when white people ‘can’t see’ racism.

(via james-bliss)

(Source: that-wasnt, via guerrillamamamedicine)

Filed under bodies black bodies race racemaking violence pleasure

349 notes

Occupy Wall Street March Turns Violent

stfuconservatives:

eugeniedefranval submitted (seriously thank you for submitting all these)

NYPD supervisor Pepper Sprays young girl point blank

The peaceful Occupy Wall Street protest march turned violent as the NYPD corralled and pepper sprayed the participants. Mass arrests were made and loaded onto a NYC bus further locking traffic. The protest march took a route from Zuccotti Park to Union Square on East 14th Street. The protesters were marching back to Zuccotti Park when the NYPD turned violent. Hitting, arresting and forcing protesters into a small area. At that point a NYPD supervisor yelled shut up to one of the protesters and shot pepper spray into her eyes point blank range and hitting a half dozen protesters (including 3 police officers) when they had nowhere to go. The same supervising officer was seen (photographed) laughing after the arrests while looking at his text messages. The peaceful protest march started as 300 participants but rose to over 1,000 as the event stopped traffic in lower Manhattan. People spontaneously joined the march over a 2 hour period.

NYPD supervisor laughing after pepper spraying young girl

(Source: stfuconservatives, via anarchofeminist)

Filed under occupywallstreet submission article photos capitalism demonstration police violence police violence

22,263 notes



Michael Moore: Do you know that on the day of the Columbine massacre, the US dropped more bombs on Kosovo than any other day? 
Marilyn Manson: I do know that, and I think that’s really ironic, that nobody said ‘Well maybe the President had an influence on this violent behavior’. Because that’s not the way the media wants to take it and spin it, and turn it into fear, because then you’re watching television, you’re watching the news, you’re being pumped full of fear, there’s floods, there’s AIDS, there’s murder, cut to commercial, buy the Acura, buy the Colgate, if you have bad breath they’re not going to talk to you, if you have pimples, the girl’s not going to fuck you, and it’s just this campaign of fear, and consumption, and that’s what I think it’s all based on, the whole idea of ‘keep everyone afraid, and they’ll consume.’

Michael Moore: Do you know that on the day of the Columbine massacre, the US dropped more bombs on Kosovo than any other day? 

Marilyn Manson: I do know that, and I think that’s really ironic, that nobody said ‘Well maybe the President had an influence on this violent behavior’. Because that’s not the way the media wants to take it and spin it, and turn it into fear, because then you’re watching television, you’re watching the news, you’re being pumped full of fear, there’s floods, there’s AIDS, there’s murder, cut to commercial, buy the Acura, buy the Colgate, if you have bad breath they’re not going to talk to you, if you have pimples, the girl’s not going to fuck you, and it’s just this campaign of fear, and consumption, and that’s what I think it’s all based on, the whole idea of ‘keep everyone afraid, and they’ll consume.’

(via lesbianlegbreaker)

Filed under Marilyn Manson Michael Moore Bowling For Colombine Violence Kosovo USA American Terrorist Action Bombs Militarism

34 notes

Note-a-bear: blackamazon: I think I know what’s the “problem” with man down . (...

blackamazon:

I think I know what’s the “problem” with man down .
( buckle in it’s gonna be long)

Rihanna thinks she’s a person . Rihanna thinks West Indian women are people . Rihanna doesn’t think she’s a rolemodel . Rihanna doesn’t think she is an embassador for her culture as much as a member of it , and she has the gosh dang nerve to embrace the idea that it’s not ALWAYS UP TO HER TO BE THE BETTER person.

I was thinking about this during the amazing Country decision BFP spearheaded and when I watched again after my I AM 26 YEARS OLD post.

Being West Indian , vengenance , anger, and limited paths of redressing of them are part and parcel of the historical narrative.

Bribes for cops have funny names, kids by slave owners run around and have sold their own mom’s .

We’re culturally singular each and every  country , but poverty means that parts of Domenica looks like parts of Barbados look like parts of Guyana.

People hate on us regularly , for being  poor , slack , angry, crazy knife happy and ..weird

While bopping their heads to our music, stealing or cultural foods , and salivating over our women . We’re appropriated and insulted time after time .

Drink Tea with our sugar and call us lazy

Bop Your Heads to Hip Hop and don’t know DJ Cool Herc
We’re the people who stay in what most people consider transitory points , you either vacation, or emigrate from  to a “better” place

To be from their is to be constantly seen as colonized

As opposed to Gretchen Wilson and the Dixie Chicks there isn’t that level of international communal property to your very existence .

And Mandown is all about the life of this proto Rihanna as a girl , a pretty well loved girl in the West Indies . Not as a piece of eye candy , not as an untouchable superstar, as an emblem , or a performer, but as a girl.

A girl who hugs her small cousins, teases the local rudebois, kisses an aunty at a van stop , and rides her bike.

She’s not ( yet ) writing from a long suffering pushed me to the brink perspective.  This isn’t a power anthem of how much we can take

This is a one time  is enough , and it is WORTH it and I can be sorry and conflicted  but unapologetic about wanting someone  dead who would violate you in this way.

This isn’t 30+ year old women snarking or comically pointing , this is a young woman of a specific location  emphasizing agency and personhood ( in admittedly violent ways) in a locus where she should have NONE

She’s a gorgeous woman , who should be possessed cause well beautiful women, public property ,

She’s a West Indian Woman who is being vulnerable , not speaking for the entire Caricom entity, and airing the dirty laundry  She’s also loving however metaphorically a place most people see as their hedonistic playgrounds

She’s a celebrity who casts her self as neither hero or villain but as person 

Things she is not supposed to do around identities that are supposed to be agreed on as worthless or cartoonish or for public consumption first and foremost.
and if someone thinks like RIHANNA ( CAPITAL CELEBRITY MODEL GLAMAZON ) thinks someone like Robin Rihanna ( daughter Bajan Guyanese school girl ) is worth that story

What’s everyone else’s excuse that they don’t?

Filed under rihanna man down violence rape culture commentary truth

18 notes

Feministing: Internet erupts over video of trans woman attacked at McDonald's

Late last week video of a trans woman being beaten by two cis women in a Baltimore area McDonald’s made its way online. The video was shot by Vernon Hackett, who put the video out in public, basically trying to turn the brutal attack into torture porn. Hackett has since been fired.

The posting of the video and subsequent e-media storm has forced Chrissy Lee Polis, the woman who was attacked, out into the open and made her more fearful for her safety. The beating was brutal enough already, and Polis says it was not the only transphobic violence she has experienced. The internet reaction, where Polis’ personal information has been dug up and she’s been put in a position where she felt the need to speak up publicly is a disturbing heaping on of injury. Reactions to the attackers, two young women of color, and the creator of the video, a man of color, have also been disturbing. Many have focused on race, painting a picture of people of color as violent or racist themselves, instead of recognizing this as obviously an incident of transmisogyny.

(Source: note-a-bear, via reinventionoftheprintingpress-d)

Filed under feministing fucked up shit hate crimes trans* violence racism transmisogyny

133 notes

Sex workers often work in isolation because of the criminalized status of the work, but I don’t think sex workers live in isolation,” said Ms. Ray, now program director for the Red Umbrella Project, which helps sex workers tell their stories publicly. “There’s an assumption that if your life has gotten that bad, you’re expendable. That’s not true. A lot of people do care. We’re just not listened to.

Prostitute Disappearances Unnoticed Until Bodies Were Found - NYTimes.com

There’s a really good, sensitive article about sex work and violence in the New York Times. I’m pleased with my quotes, and there’s a good shout out to the Red Umbrella Project.

Last night, at the Red Umbrella Diaries, I was introduced to the families of two of the performers, and the third performer spoke about her family in her piece. Certainly, not all sex workers have such supportive family in their lives, but many do - or at least have relationships with their families. Which means that people care when we go missing. But “people” don’t include the police or the media, unless the body count is more than one.

On the eve of the third annual Speak Up (which I should also note, is the 2nd time in 3 years that a murder story was being reported during the training), it makes me feel my convictions ever deeper. It is essential to amplify the voices of people who have experience in the sex trade to tell our truths. Those truths will help change our circumstances if we keep telling them, while also demanding the end of oppressive policies that criminalize us and make it difficult or impossible for us to access services and live safer lives.

(via audaciaray)

(via reinventionoftheprintingpress-d)

Filed under sex workers isolation violence quotes

109 notes

While many might assume the perpetrators of such assaults are closeted gay soldiers, military experts and outside researchers say assailants usually are heterosexual. Like in prisons and other predominantly male environments, male-on-male assault in the military, experts say, is motivated not by homosexuality, but power, intimidation, and domination. Assault victims, both male and female, are typically young and low-ranking; they are targeted for their vulnerability. Often, in male-on-male cases, assailants go after those they assume are gay, even if they are not. “One of the reasons people commit sexual assault is to put people in their place, to drive them out,” says Mic Hunter, author of Honor Betrayed: Sexual Abuse in America’s Military. “Sexual assault isn’t about sex, it’s about violence.”

The Military’s Secret Shame

When men in the military rape other men in the ranks, no one wants to talk about it. Why the sexual assault of males in the service is finally being confronted.

“Sexual assault isn’t about sex, it’s about violence.”

“Sexual assault isn’t about sex, it’s about violence.”

“Sexual assault isn’t about sex, it’s about violence.”

Holy shit! Who would have thought?

(via janedoe225)

(via lesbianlegbreaker)

Filed under rape military homosexuality rape is about power violence

155 notes

I don’t favor violence. If we could bring about recognition and respect of our people by peaceful means, well and good. Everybody would like to reach his objectives peacefully. But I’m also a realist. The only people in this country who are asked to be nonviolent are black people.
Malcolm X (via fuckyeahmalcolmx)

(Source: , via note-a-bear)

Filed under quotes Malcolm X violence racism