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Posts tagged neat

3,452 notes

kropotkitten:

maptitude:

This is a endonym map - a map in which labels are written as they would be in the area being labeled. In other words, each country’s name is written in its native language. It’s a great representation of how our own maps are very tailored to our own use, in ways we don’t usually think about. You can see more of this map here.

ugh, i just noticed they got Ireland wrong…and that most of Africa’s countries are given French names…I don’t know much about the history of the Arabization of North Africa, but i wonder if those names are correct but using Arabic script? Needless to say, this map is pretty colonialist as far as the use of French and Portuguese names for African nations.
Something I can talk about: English is not the native language of Ireland, it was forced upon it by the colonizers, the British (sorry Scots friends, but your people took an active role in the colonization as well, owning plantations and such)
The native language of Ireland is Irish, in Irish Ireland has multiple names though in English it usually goes by the Republic of Ireland, to differentiate between Northern Ireland, which is still colonized by the British
Éire  the official name of Ireland according to the Constitution drafted when part of Ireland was finally free of English rule
Poblacht na hÉireann
the legal name of Ireland, in english: The Republic of Ireland.
and just for fun here is a bunch of ancient names the island was known as to its dwellers and to its neighbors
The Annals of the Four Masters describes how Ireland was referred to in ancient times[citation needed]

During the time of the Partholonians, Nemedians, Fomorians, and Firbolg, the island was given a number of names:[citation needed]Inis Ealga signifying the noble or excellent island. The Latin translation was Insula Nobilis
Fiodh-Inis signifying the Woody island. In Latin this was Insula nemorosa
Crioch Fuinidh signifying the Final or remote country. In Latin as Terra finalia.

Inisfail meaning the Island of Destiny, and Inisfalia or Insula Fatalis in Latin. This was the name used by the Tuatha Dé Danann and from this ‘Fál’ became an ancient name for Ireland. In this respect, therefore, Lia Fáil, the Stone of Destiny, came to mean ‘Stone of Ireland’. Inisfail appears as a synonym for Erin in some Irish romantic and nationalist poetry in English in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; Aubrey Thomas de Vere's 1863 poem Inisfail is an example.
Ériu (from which derived Éire), Banba and Fódla where names given by the Dananns from three of their queens.
‘Ierne’ refers to Ireland by various ancient Greek writers and many scholars have the opinion that in the poem when the Argonauts passes Neson Iernida, that is, the Island Iernis, they are referring to the island of Ireland, thus referring to Ireland longer ago than 1000 BC.
Insula Sacra or the “Sacred Isle” was how several Roman writers referred to the island on account of its being a celebrated seat of Druidism.
Ogygia meaning the most ancient land is a name used by Plutarch in the first century which may refer to Ireland.
Hibernia is first used to refer to Ireland by Julius Caesar in his account of Britain, and became a common term used by the Romans. They also used a number of other terms, namely Juverna, Juvernia, Ouvernia, Ibernia, Ierna, Vernia. Ptolemy also refers to it as Iouernia or Ivernia.
Scotia or the land of the Scots is a term used by various Roman and other Latin writers, who referred to Irish raiders as Scoti. Some of the earliest mentions are in the 5th century, St. Patrick calls the Irish “Scoti”, and in the 6th century, St. Isidore bishop of Seville and Gildas the British historian both refer to Ireland as Scotia. It was a term that exclusively referred to Ireland up until the eleventh century when modern Scotland was first referred to as Scotia. But even up until the sixteenth century, many Latin writers continued to refer to Ireland as Scotia. From the twelfth to the sixteenth century, various scholars used to distinguish between Ireland and Scotland by using Scotia Vetus or Scotia Major meaning Old Scotia or the Greater Scotia for Ireland, and Scotia Minor or Lesser Scotia for Scotland.
Insula Sanctorum or the Island of the Saints and Insula Docturum or the Island of the Learned are names used by various Latin writers; hence the modern-day quasi-poetic description of the island as the “Land of Saints and Scholars”.

The bolded ones are my personal favorites, I especially liked the three names of Ireland after the ancient queens

kropotkitten:

maptitude:

This is a endonym map - a map in which labels are written as they would be in the area being labeled. In other words, each country’s name is written in its native language. It’s a great representation of how our own maps are very tailored to our own use, in ways we don’t usually think about. You can see more of this map here.

ugh, i just noticed they got Ireland wrong…and that most of Africa’s countries are given French names…I don’t know much about the history of the Arabization of North Africa, but i wonder if those names are correct but using Arabic script? Needless to say, this map is pretty colonialist as far as the use of French and Portuguese names for African nations.

Something I can talk about: English is not the native language of Ireland, it was forced upon it by the colonizers, the British (sorry Scots friends, but your people took an active role in the colonization as well, owning plantations and such)

The native language of Ireland is Irish, in Irish Ireland has multiple names though in English it usually goes by the Republic of Ireland, to differentiate between Northern Ireland, which is still colonized by the British

Éire 
the official name of Ireland according to the Constitution drafted when part of Ireland was finally free of English rule

Poblacht na hÉireann


the legal name of Ireland, in english: The Republic of Ireland.

and just for fun here is a bunch of ancient names the island was known as to its dwellers and to its neighbors

The Annals of the Four Masters describes how Ireland was referred to in ancient times[citation needed]

  • During the time of the Partholonians, Nemedians, Fomorians, and Firbolg, the island was given a number of names:[citation needed]
    • Inis Ealga signifying the noble or excellent island. The Latin translation was Insula Nobilis
    • Fiodh-Inis signifying the Woody island. In Latin this was Insula nemorosa
    • Crioch Fuinidh signifying the Final or remote country. In Latin as Terra finalia.
  • Inisfail meaning the Island of Destiny, and Inisfalia or Insula Fatalis in Latin. This was the name used by the Tuatha Dé Danann and from this ‘Fál’ became an ancient name for Ireland. In this respect, therefore, Lia Fáil, the Stone of Destiny, came to mean ‘Stone of Ireland’. Inisfail appears as a synonym for Erin in some Irish romantic and nationalist poetry in English in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; Aubrey Thomas de Vere's 1863 poem Inisfail is an example.
  • Ériu (from which derived Éire), Banba and Fódla where names given by the Dananns from three of their queens.
  • Ierne’ refers to Ireland by various ancient Greek writers and many scholars have the opinion that in the poem when the Argonauts passes Neson Iernida, that is, the Island Iernis, they are referring to the island of Ireland, thus referring to Ireland longer ago than 1000 BC.
  • Insula Sacra or the “Sacred Isle” was how several Roman writers referred to the island on account of its being a celebrated seat of Druidism.
  • Ogygia meaning the most ancient land is a name used by Plutarch in the first century which may refer to Ireland.
  • Hibernia is first used to refer to Ireland by Julius Caesar in his account of Britain, and became a common term used by the Romans. They also used a number of other terms, namely Juverna, Juvernia, Ouvernia, Ibernia, Ierna, Vernia. Ptolemy also refers to it as Iouernia or Ivernia.
  • Scotia or the land of the Scots is a term used by various Roman and other Latin writers, who referred to Irish raiders as Scoti. Some of the earliest mentions are in the 5th century, St. Patrick calls the Irish “Scoti”, and in the 6th century, St. Isidore bishop of Seville and Gildas the British historian both refer to Ireland as Scotia. It was a term that exclusively referred to Ireland up until the eleventh century when modern Scotland was first referred to as Scotia. But even up until the sixteenth century, many Latin writers continued to refer to Ireland as Scotia. From the twelfth to the sixteenth century, various scholars used to distinguish between Ireland and Scotland by using Scotia Vetus or Scotia Major meaning Old Scotia or the Greater Scotia for Ireland, and Scotia Minor or Lesser Scotia for Scotland.
  • Insula Sanctorum or the Island of the Saints and Insula Docturum or the Island of the Learned are names used by various Latin writers; hence the modern-day quasi-poetic description of the island as the “Land of Saints and Scholars”.

The bolded ones are my personal favorites, I especially liked the three names of Ireland after the ancient queens

(Source: maptitude1)

Filed under neat

3,452 notes

kropotkitten:

maptitude:

This is a endonym map - a map in which labels are written as they would be in the area being labeled. In other words, each country’s name is written in its native language. It’s a great representation of how our own maps are very tailored to our own use, in ways we don’t usually think about. You can see more of this map here.

ugh, i just noticed they got Ireland wrong…and that most of Africa’s countries are given French names…I don’t know much about the history of the Arabization of North Africa, but i wonder if those names are correct but using Arabic script? Needless to say, this map is pretty colonialist as far as the use of French and Portuguese names for African nations.
Something I can talk about: English is not the native language of Ireland, it was forced upon it by the colonizers, the British (sorry Scots friends, but your people took an active role in the colonization as well, owning plantations and such)
The native language of Ireland is Irish, in Irish Ireland has multiple names though in English it usually goes by the Republic of Ireland, to differentiate between Northern Ireland, which is still colonized by the British
Éire  the official name of Ireland according to the Constitution drafted when part of Ireland was finally free of English rule
Poblacht na hÉireann
the legal name of Ireland, in english: The Republic of Ireland.
and just for fun here is a bunch of ancient names the island was known as to its dwellers and to its neighbors
The Annals of the Four Masters describes how Ireland was referred to in ancient times[citation needed]

During the time of the Partholonians, Nemedians, Fomorians, and Firbolg, the island was given a number of names:[citation needed]Inis Ealga signifying the noble or excellent island. The Latin translation was Insula Nobilis
Fiodh-Inis signifying the Woody island. In Latin this was Insula nemorosa
Crioch Fuinidh signifying the Final or remote country. In Latin as Terra finalia.

Inisfail meaning the Island of Destiny, and Inisfalia or Insula Fatalis in Latin. This was the name used by the Tuatha Dé Danann and from this ‘Fál’ became an ancient name for Ireland. In this respect, therefore, Lia Fáil, the Stone of Destiny, came to mean ‘Stone of Ireland’. Inisfail appears as a synonym for Erin in some Irish romantic and nationalist poetry in English in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; Aubrey Thomas de Vere's 1863 poem Inisfail is an example.
Ériu (from which derived Éire), Banba and Fódla where names given by the Dananns from three of their queens.
‘Ierne’ refers to Ireland by various ancient Greek writers and many scholars have the opinion that in the poem when the Argonauts passes Neson Iernida, that is, the Island Iernis, they are referring to the island of Ireland, thus referring to Ireland longer ago than 1000 BC.
Insula Sacra or the “Sacred Isle” was how several Roman writers referred to the island on account of its being a celebrated seat of Druidism.
Ogygia meaning the most ancient land is a name used by Plutarch in the first century which may refer to Ireland.
Hibernia is first used to refer to Ireland by Julius Caesar in his account of Britain, and became a common term used by the Romans. They also used a number of other terms, namely Juverna, Juvernia, Ouvernia, Ibernia, Ierna, Vernia. Ptolemy also refers to it as Iouernia or Ivernia.
Scotia or the land of the Scots is a term used by various Roman and other Latin writers, who referred to Irish raiders as Scoti. Some of the earliest mentions are in the 5th century, St. Patrick calls the Irish “Scoti”, and in the 6th century, St. Isidore bishop of Seville and Gildas the British historian both refer to Ireland as Scotia. It was a term that exclusively referred to Ireland up until the eleventh century when modern Scotland was first referred to as Scotia. But even up until the sixteenth century, many Latin writers continued to refer to Ireland as Scotia. From the twelfth to the sixteenth century, various scholars used to distinguish between Ireland and Scotland by using Scotia Vetus or Scotia Major meaning Old Scotia or the Greater Scotia for Ireland, and Scotia Minor or Lesser Scotia for Scotland.
Insula Sanctorum or the Island of the Saints and Insula Docturum or the Island of the Learned are names used by various Latin writers; hence the modern-day quasi-poetic description of the island as the “Land of Saints and Scholars”.

The bolded ones are my personal favorites, I especially liked the three names of Ireland after the ancient queens

kropotkitten:

maptitude:

This is a endonym map - a map in which labels are written as they would be in the area being labeled. In other words, each country’s name is written in its native language. It’s a great representation of how our own maps are very tailored to our own use, in ways we don’t usually think about. You can see more of this map here.

ugh, i just noticed they got Ireland wrong…and that most of Africa’s countries are given French names…I don’t know much about the history of the Arabization of North Africa, but i wonder if those names are correct but using Arabic script? Needless to say, this map is pretty colonialist as far as the use of French and Portuguese names for African nations.

Something I can talk about: English is not the native language of Ireland, it was forced upon it by the colonizers, the British (sorry Scots friends, but your people took an active role in the colonization as well, owning plantations and such)

The native language of Ireland is Irish, in Irish Ireland has multiple names though in English it usually goes by the Republic of Ireland, to differentiate between Northern Ireland, which is still colonized by the British

Éire 
the official name of Ireland according to the Constitution drafted when part of Ireland was finally free of English rule

Poblacht na hÉireann


the legal name of Ireland, in english: The Republic of Ireland.

and just for fun here is a bunch of ancient names the island was known as to its dwellers and to its neighbors

The Annals of the Four Masters describes how Ireland was referred to in ancient times[citation needed]

  • During the time of the Partholonians, Nemedians, Fomorians, and Firbolg, the island was given a number of names:[citation needed]
    • Inis Ealga signifying the noble or excellent island. The Latin translation was Insula Nobilis
    • Fiodh-Inis signifying the Woody island. In Latin this was Insula nemorosa
    • Crioch Fuinidh signifying the Final or remote country. In Latin as Terra finalia.
  • Inisfail meaning the Island of Destiny, and Inisfalia or Insula Fatalis in Latin. This was the name used by the Tuatha Dé Danann and from this ‘Fál’ became an ancient name for Ireland. In this respect, therefore, Lia Fáil, the Stone of Destiny, came to mean ‘Stone of Ireland’. Inisfail appears as a synonym for Erin in some Irish romantic and nationalist poetry in English in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; Aubrey Thomas de Vere's 1863 poem Inisfail is an example.
  • Ériu (from which derived Éire), Banba and Fódla where names given by the Dananns from three of their queens.
  • Ierne’ refers to Ireland by various ancient Greek writers and many scholars have the opinion that in the poem when the Argonauts passes Neson Iernida, that is, the Island Iernis, they are referring to the island of Ireland, thus referring to Ireland longer ago than 1000 BC.
  • Insula Sacra or the “Sacred Isle” was how several Roman writers referred to the island on account of its being a celebrated seat of Druidism.
  • Ogygia meaning the most ancient land is a name used by Plutarch in the first century which may refer to Ireland.
  • Hibernia is first used to refer to Ireland by Julius Caesar in his account of Britain, and became a common term used by the Romans. They also used a number of other terms, namely Juverna, Juvernia, Ouvernia, Ibernia, Ierna, Vernia. Ptolemy also refers to it as Iouernia or Ivernia.
  • Scotia or the land of the Scots is a term used by various Roman and other Latin writers, who referred to Irish raiders as Scoti. Some of the earliest mentions are in the 5th century, St. Patrick calls the Irish “Scoti”, and in the 6th century, St. Isidore bishop of Seville and Gildas the British historian both refer to Ireland as Scotia. It was a term that exclusively referred to Ireland up until the eleventh century when modern Scotland was first referred to as Scotia. But even up until the sixteenth century, many Latin writers continued to refer to Ireland as Scotia. From the twelfth to the sixteenth century, various scholars used to distinguish between Ireland and Scotland by using Scotia Vetus or Scotia Major meaning Old Scotia or the Greater Scotia for Ireland, and Scotia Minor or Lesser Scotia for Scotland.
  • Insula Sanctorum or the Island of the Saints and Insula Docturum or the Island of the Learned are names used by various Latin writers; hence the modern-day quasi-poetic description of the island as the “Land of Saints and Scholars”.

The bolded ones are my personal favorites, I especially liked the three names of Ireland after the ancient queens

(Source: maptitude1)

Filed under neat

1,449 notes

androgynish:

feministblackboard:

Five genders

I thought this might be interesting to some of you. This is a group of people who believe that in order to live harmoniously with each other they must all openly accept all five genders. This culture is called Bugi. 

In essense the five genders according to this culture are cismen (oroané), ciswomen (makkunrai), transmen (calalai), transwomen (calabai) and genderqueer (bissu). 

It is sad that westerners are still hung up on the rules of religion and what is considered taboo. On the plus side, it is wonderful to see other cultures moving forward in such a way.

This is super interesting.

(Source: feminist-blackboard)

Filed under neat gender video inclusivity