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Posts tagged environment

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Wangari Maathai, the first African woman to win the Nobel peace prize, died on Sunday night of cancer. She was 71.

A towering figure in Kenya, Maathai was renowned as a fearless social activist and an environmental crusader. Her Green Belt Movement, which she founded in 1977, planted tens of millions of trees.

Maathai’s death was confirmed in a statement on the movement’s website.

“It is with great sadness that the family of Professor Wangari Maathai announces her passing away on 25 September 2011, at the Nairobi hospital, after a prolonged and bravely borne struggle with cancer. Her loved ones were with her at the time.”

Maathai was a pioneer from an early age and in many spheres. After winning a scholarship to study in the US, she returned to a newly independent Kenya, becoming the first woman in east and central Africa to obtain a PhD. Maathai was also the first woman professor the University of Nairobi, where she taught veterinary medicine.

Her work with voluntary groups alerted her to the struggles of women in rural Kenya, and it quickly became her life’s cause. Noticing how the rapid environmental degradation was affecting women’s lives, she encouraged them to plant trees to ensure future supplies of firewood and to protect water sources and crops.

Maathai’s agenda quickly widened as she joined the struggle against the repressive and corrupt regime of Daniel arap Moi. Her efforts to stop powerful politicians grabbing land, especially forests, brought her into conflict with the authorities, and she was beaten and arrested numerous times. Her bravery and defiance made her a hero in Kenya. […]

Maathai had been in and out of hospital this year, though most Kenyans were unaware of her illness until it was reported in the local media late last week.

“Professor Maathai’s departure is untimely and a very great loss to all who knew her – as a mother, relative, co-worker, colleague, role model, and heroine; or who admired her determination to make the world a more peaceful, healthier, and better place,” the statement from her organisation said.

Maathai is survived by her three children and a granddaughter.

Wangari Maathai, Nobel peace prize winner, dies at 71 | World news | guardian.co.uk (via teramerapyar)

(via boogerbrains-deactivated2013051)

Filed under Wangari Maathai Africa Kenya environment badass women

1,058 notes

thedailywhat:

Nest Egg of the Day: Inspired by a cost-efficient housing project called “City’s egg” and the burden of big-city rent, Hunan City University architecture department alum Dai Haifei constructed a $964 solar-powered, egg-shaped home outside his office in Beijing. The unit is equipped with a single bed, a water tank, and a lamp. “
I feel good living here though it’s simple, and a bit cold sometimes,” Dai is quoted as saying. “[What’s] important for me, is - it saves me a lot of money!”
[dvice.]

thedailywhat:

Nest Egg of the Day: Inspired by a cost-efficient housing project called “City’s egg” and the burden of big-city rent, Hunan City University architecture department alum Dai Haifei constructed a $964 solar-powered, egg-shaped home outside his office in Beijing. The unit is equipped with a single bed, a water tank, and a lamp. “

I feel good living here though it’s simple, and a bit cold sometimes,” Dai is quoted as saying. “[What’s] important for me, is - it saves me a lot of money!”

[dvice.]

(Source: thedailywhat)

Filed under green living architecture environment

66 notes

constantflux:

From far away, the picture above might look like a fuzzy coconut sticking out of the water, but upon closer inspection, you’ll see that it’s actually a massive building made almost entirely of bamboo and other natural materials. Designed and constructed by Vo Trong Nghia, who is known as a somewhat of a bamboo building virtuoso, the domed structure is called the Water and Wind Cafe and resides in the Binh Duong province of Vietnam. Not only does the cafe showcase how versatile and strong bamboo, which is a rapid-growing renewable material, can be, it was also built without the use of even one nail!
 
We’ve seen other bamboo buildings before but what makes Nghia’s stand out is the dynamic domed shapes he is able to achieve with the material – especially without the use of modern machinery or metal structures. In fact, every bit of bamboo in the design was woven together using traditional Vietnamese weaving techniques.
The cafe’s frame measures 30 feet high and features an opening at the very top of the dome that allows daylight to stream inside. Like many other Vietnamese structures, it is covered in a local bush plant, which evokes an African-esque aesthetic. And contrary to what you might think about building with natural, local materials, the end result is not “homemade” looking at all and is actually rather streamlined and majestic.

constantflux:

From far away, the picture above might look like a fuzzy coconut sticking out of the water, but upon closer inspection, you’ll see that it’s actually a massive building made almost entirely of bamboo and other natural materials. Designed and constructed by Vo Trong Nghia, who is known as a somewhat of a bamboo building virtuoso, the domed structure is called the Water and Wind Cafe and resides in the Binh Duong province of Vietnam. Not only does the cafe showcase how versatile and strong bamboo, which is a rapid-growing renewable material, can be, it was also built without the use of even one nail!

We’ve seen other bamboo buildings before but what makes Nghia’s stand out is the dynamic domed shapes he is able to achieve with the material – especially without the use of modern machinery or metal structures. In fact, every bit of bamboo in the design was woven together using traditional Vietnamese weaving techniques.

The cafe’s frame measures 30 feet high and features an opening at the very top of the dome that allows daylight to stream inside. Like many other Vietnamese structures, it is covered in a local bush plant, which evokes an African-esque aesthetic. And contrary to what you might think about building with natural, local materials, the end result is not “homemade” looking at all and is actually rather streamlined and majestic.

(via constantflux1-deactivated2011020)

Filed under baller environment low impact clever bamboo Architecture want

203 notes

Study: Wi-Fi Makes Our Trees Sick

loveandzombies:

itsthemusicpeople:

i don’t want wi-fi anymore.

infoneer-pulse:

Data centers hum day and night. More often than ever before we connect to these cloud environments through Wi-Fi networks.

According to PCWorld, now it looks like the radiation from Wi-Fi networks is making our trees sick, “causing significant variations in growth, as well as bleeding and fissures in the bark.”

All deciduous trees in the Western hemisphere are affected by the radiation. The study was conducted by the Wageningen University. The research was ordered by officials from the city of  Alphen aan den Rijn who began discovering trees that had a sickness that could not be identified as a virus or bacterial infection.

After further study, it was discovered that the disease occurred throughout the Western world.

» via ReadWriteWeb

THIS IS EXTREMELY UPSETTING.

somehow i’m not surprised..

(via guerrillamamamedicine)

Filed under wifi Environment everythings fucked